Results tagged ‘ fantasy managers ’

Trade Stephen Strasburg At the All-Star Break

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports and @BloombergSports

To say that Nationals ace Stephen Strasburg has lived up to expectations so far this season would be an understatement.  The Opening Day starter is a perfect 2-0 while allowing just three runs to score in 25 innings.  He also seems to be pitching with little exertion, as his 25:6 strikeout-to-walk ratio suggests fine control, but we have not seen the 100 MPH heat that Strasburg is capable of.

It is clear that hitters have little chance off him, as he has not surrendered a home run in two years and the opposing batting average remains well under .200 in his nine starts over that period.  At 23 years old, Strasburg still remains very young and for that reason the Nationals are handling him with gloves.

In fact, the biggest strike against Strasburg’s fantasy value is the fact that the Nationals have already announced that he will throw only 160 innings this season.  That equates to just another 135 innings of dominance for those keeping track.

Even Strasburg limited to 160 innings works out to be one of the best pitchers in fantasy baseball.  However, to maximize his value, fantasy managers should consider trading the ace around the All-Star break.  By then they should have enjoyed a dominant stretch with Strsburg potentially ranking as the best hurler in baseball.  However, with his innings limited in the second half of the season, Strasburg becomes little better than a dominant reliever.

While the Nationals are keeping his future in mind with hopes that the franchise has many years of dominance ahead, fantasy managers must realize that Strasburg is only a short-term fix in this year’s fantasy leagues.

For more fantasy insight visit Bloombergsports.com

White Sox SP Philip Humber Embraces Fantasy Dream Week

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

One of the top stories for the White Sox last season was the breakout season by former first round pick Philip Humber.  Selected by the Mets with the third pick of the 2004 draft, Humber dealt with injuries and never met expectations when he was traded for Johan Santana in 2008.  The trade did not exactly work out for the Twins, as Humber moved to the White Sox and aside from him the only other key contributor is their former centerfielder Carlos Gomez, who proved to be a part-time player. 

 

Last season, Humber finally got a crack at sticking in the Big Leagues.  He made 26 starts and 28 appearances.  Though his record was just 9-9, more impressive was his 3.75 ERA and 1.18 WHIP despite pitching in a hitter’s ballpark. What separates Humber from most pitchers is his devastating curveball.  In fact, he ranked fourth in Major League Baseball last season with a .159 opposing average against his curveball.

 

If there is an area for Humber to improve, it’s his stamina.  In his first full season in the Big Leagues, Humber experienced a major drop off after the fifth inning, as his ERA spiked from 2.96 to 6.34.  At that point, his control fell a bit and his opposing average spiked to .305.  Of course, the increased workload may explain the trend.   

 

Humber has a dream week in fantasy baseball, as he opens with a start against an overzealous Orioles offense that lacks much plate discipline.  He aced that test, allowing just one run to score in 5.1 innings of work, while fanning 7 batters.  Next, he hurls in Seattle’s cavernous Safeco Field, against a mediocre Mariners offense. 

 

Fantasy managers should plug Humber for both starts this week.  For more fantasy baseball insight visit BloombergSports.com.

 

Fantasy Baseball Panic: Shoo, Davis, Ramirez, and Lincecum

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

To put it mildly, Aramis Ramirez has not had Brewers fans forget about Prince Fielder.  While Fielder has already offered the Tigers a .345 average with two home runs, Ramirez has chipped in with just a .129 average and no home runs for the Brew Crew.  This is a far cry from the .306 average Ramirez offered last season, not to mention the expectations coming into this season with Milwaukee.

While Ramirez is off to a slow start, he has had a tad of bad luck.  Alfonso Soriano robbed him at the left-field wall of an extra base hit on Tuesday, and he already has swiped two bases while nailing two doubles.  Plus, Ramirez is a notorious slow starter as March and April are his worst batting months throughout his career.

At this point, fantasy managers should be in a holding pattern, as Ramirez is likely to bounce back.  For the first time this season, Ramirez did not strike out in two consecutive games.  It looks like he is starting to see the ball better, and that usually leads to a rise in batting average and the power metrics.  Patience is a virtue in dealing with A-Ram’s early slump.

There has been a very scary trend in Cleveland for fantasy managers in recent years.  We’ve seen players who reach superstardom with the Indians only to lose their luster seemingly overnight due to injuries.

First it was MVP contender Travis Hafner, who went from a .300-plus hitting machine with loads of power to a lackluster DH who struggles to stay healthy.  More recently, it’s been all-around sensation Grady Sizemore, who has lost his speed and power in recent years and now is once again on the disabled list for an extended period.

The question that is plaguing fantasy managers right now is whether Shin-Soo Choo will follow that undesirable path.  Following consecutive 20-20 seasons, Choo had a season to forget last year with off-the-field controversy followed by an injury-plagued season.  Fresh off his worst season with 8 home runs and a .259 average, Choo is struggling once again.  The two-time 20-20 fantasy star has five hits, all of them singles.

The good news is that Shoo is drawing walks and already has two stolen bases while his OBP is north of .400.  For now fantasy managers should be in a holding power with Choo.  The solid plate discipline suggests that he is seeing the ball well and could bust out of his power outage at any moment.  In fact, if you have confidence in the 29-year-old outfielder go ahead and acquire him while his stock is low.

What’s the deal with Mets first baseman Ike Davis?  Last season he got off to a excellent start before a bum ankle shut him down for the season with seven home runs, 25 RBI, and a .302 average through 36 games.  This season has been the total opposite.  Davis has two hits through 28 at bats, and both hits have been singles.

While the Mets are calling Davis healthy, there are some questions as to whether a fungal disease suffered during spring training is still limiting him physically, or if at this point, the toll is mental, as Davis has 10 strikeouts through the first eight games of the season.

To be specific, the ailment that Davis encountered this spring was Valley Fever, a lung disease that could lead to fatigue.  It very much should be taken seriously, as the illness once knocked 130 games out of the season from Conor Jackson.  So yes, fantasy managers should be on red alert, as the disease commonly found in desert environments such as Davis’ hometown in Phoenix could be an issue.

Some good news is that David Wright returned from his broken pinkie on Saturday and blasted a home run.  With Wright’s return to the Mets lineup, there are more likely to be runners on base for Davis to drive home.  Furthermore, Lucas Duda has looked very much like a slugger this season with three home runs already.  With Duda batting behind Davis, there could be an uptick in the runs scored as well.

Of course, the main focus for Davis right not is to snap out of the slump, then he will no longer hear the whispers of mystery ailments and more concerns about the health of Mets players.

When last season concluded with Tim Lincecum brandishing a losing record, there was not much panic in San Francisco as his 13-14 record came with a superb 2.74 ERA and 1.21 WHIP.  On that note, fantasy managers again picked Lincecum early in the drafts this season expecting him to contend with rival Clayton Kershaw for the NL Cy Young award.  Through two starts the Giants ace may have already pitched himself out of contention.

Tim Lincecum currently sits at 0-1 with a 12.91 ERA.  Fantasy managers are wondering if it will it be sink or swim by the Bay this season for Lincecum.  This is a major concern for a number of reasons, but near the top of the list is that Lincecum is usually strong out of the gates.  April is usually the best month for him, at 12-3 entering this season with a sub-3 ERA.

Another key concern has been the diminishing velocity.  Lincecum is so far throwing his fastball at 90 MPH this season, down from 91 MPH last year and 92 MPH the year before.  He relies a great deal on his high velocity since his outpitch is no longer his slider, but his change-up.  In fact, Lincecum has mentioned that he will try to avoid use of his slider this season since it puts pressure on his arm.  It will be tough to get away with just a fastball and change-up if he can’t reach the mid-90s.

Keep an eye on Lincecum’s next start as this may be a concerning trend.  For more fantasy baseball insight visit BloombergSports.com.

Meet the New York Mets Young Stars On the Rise: Murphy, Davis, and Duda

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

Bloomberg Sports Host Julie Alexandria and Bloomberg Sports Analyst Rob Shaw discuss the 2012 New York Mets, specifically the young players on the rise.

One player for fantasy managers to acquaint themselves with is Daniel Murphy.  The second baseman can help a fantasy team in many ways, specifically with depth due to his position eligibility.  In fact, Murphy played some first, second, and third base last season after struggling in the outfield in past seasons.

A top-10 hitter last season with a .320 average, Murphy has been working on driving the ball with a little more power this season.  Considering his maturation and natural growth, fantasy managers should look at Murphy as someone who can contribute a .290 average with 15 home runs and 5+ stolen bases.  There’s a good chance Murphy can end up playing better than Mets rival Chase Utley this season.

Next, there should be some fantasy excitement for the return of Ike Davis to first base for the Mets.  Davis looked like a legitimate slugger last season before enduring a season-ending ankle injury.  At 6’4 and a large frame, Davis already has great power, with 26 home runs through his first 652 at bats, but now with the fences drawn in there is even more reason to raise expectations this season.  In fact, Davis as a left-handed hitter, will be impacted the most by the fences being drawn in right-field this season.  Expect Davis to prove to be a better pickup than Marlins first baseman Gaby Sanchez.

Finally, a major sleeper this season, Lucas Duda could end up being the best homegrown slugger since Darryl Strawberry was wearing number 18 on a Mets jersey.  Duda has raised eyebrows in batting practice with his moon-shots.  After pulling or driving to center field all 10 home runs last season, Duda has already belted two home runs the opposite way this spring.

He’s a player that can belt 25-30 home runs with a respectable average.  What’s most impressive so far has been his plate discipline, which is giving hope to Mets fans that he can be the next big star in Flushing.

For more baseball insight visit BloombergSports.com.

The Bloomberg Sports Fantasy Factors Part 2

 

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

With more than 20 of the Major League Baseball teams turning to Bloomberg Sports as a business solution, fantasy managers can rest assured that their fantasy teams are in good hands.

 

Offering a trade analyzer, lineup manager, and projections for every single player in the Big Leagues, Bloomberg Sports uses an algorithm that takes into account nine Fantasy Factors.

 

In a previous article, we focused on ballpark, durability, age, and contract status.  Now the focus is on the remaining five Fantasy Factors.

 

In fantasy baseball, career trends are an important aspect to be considered when evaluating players.  In essence, fantasy managers like investors have to know what’s a growing stock and what’s a mature stock.  A player on the rise would be a growing stock and two examples are Baltimore Orioles rising stars Adam Jones and Matt Wieters.  Both players are in their mid-20s and have been improving their statistics consistently over the last few seasons.

 

On the other hand, Yankees veteran Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez are far from their prime and have recently suffered their worst seasons of their legendary careers.  It’s perfectly fine to invest in a player on the decline, as long as you are realistic about what they can produce in the upcoming season.

 

Next, luck is a Fantasy Factor that can help forecast performance.  Using an advanced statistic: BABIP, it is possible for baseball fans to find out if a player had luck on their side or if it worked against him over a given period.

 

BABIP is the batting average for balls in play and takes into account whether a player enjoyed a higher percentage than usual of balls in play falling for hits.  For instance, if a player offers a BABIP that is significantly higher than their career norm, it is often a safe bet that in the following period his performance will regress to the previous rate.

 

On the other hand, if the BABIP is abnormally low, it is safe to assume the player will have better luck ahead and his batting average and other statistics will improve.  The statistic can also be used for pitchers when looking at BABIP against the opposition.

 

Next, team support is an important fantasy factor for hitters and pitchers.  For hitters, it is a matter of whether they have players around them in the lineup that they can drive in and players who will drive them in.  In other words, team support has a direct impact with RBI and runs.  For pitchers, it’s a matter of having run support to earn wins, plus a solid defense behind them to keep runs off the board.

 

Strength of schedule is the next factor, and this is all about what ballparks and teams an opponent faces.  Pitching in the AL East is no easy task for pitchers who have to deal with the Red Sox offense in Fenway Park, the Yankees offense in Yankees Stadium, and additional hitters parks in Toronto and Baltimore.  On the other hand, the NL West calls home to several pitcher parks and limited offenses including in San Francisco, San Diego, and Los Angeles.

 

Consistency is a fantasy factor, as fantasy managers have to decide whether to gamble on a player who has great potential, but also great volatility.   A player like Geovany Soto seems to alternate between good years, while Torii Hunter and Yadier Molina are examples of players who seem to produce consistent numbers every given season.

 

To see the Fantasy Factors in action visit BloombergSports.com.

 

The Bloomberg Sports Fantasy Factors Part 1

 

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

When it comes to evaluating player performance and creating projections for the upcoming season, Bloomberg Sports takes several factors into account.  Here’s a breakdown of four of the nine factors that allow Bloomberg Sports to offer the most accurate projections in fantasy sports while attracting more than 20 Major League teams to turn to the company for scouting and advanced analytical solutions.

 

The first factor to consider is ballpark.  Over the last five years it seems like we have shifted back to the big ballparks that favor pitchers.  That is certainly the case for Citi Field, PETCO Park, and Target Field.  As a result, just about any Mets, Padres, or Twins hurler performs better at home than on the road.

 

On the other hand, there are power alleys in Yankee Stadium, Coors Field, and most definitely the Ballpark in Arlington.  Fantasy managers want to invest in the pitchers from the large cavernous and the hitters in the bandboxes.

 

On that note, be wary of pitchers who thrived in pitcher’s parks such as Mat Latos and Heath Bell who now join more hitter-friendly confines and definitely invest in hitters such as Michael Cuddyer making the move from Target Field to Coors this season.

 

The next fantasy factor to keep in mind is durability.  Fantasy managers expecting full seasons from Jose Reyes, Nelson Cruz, and Chipper Jones are playing against the odds.  There are durable hitters out there such as Yadier Molina and Roy Halladay.  Their durability is a fantasy asset since you know what to expect from them on a day-to-day basis.

 

Next, fantasy managers should consider the age of their players.  Bloomberg Sports has found 26-31 to be the prime age for baseball players.  A younger player should be approaching his peak, while older players are typically on the decline.  It should not shock you that Ichiro, Derek Jeter, and Alex Rodriguez are slowing down with age.

 

Finally, fantasy managers should consider the impact of a long-term deal.  It is very rare that the player delivers shortly after signing such a deal.  While we hate to question motivation, we have noticed that stars such as Jason Bay, John Lackey, Carl Crawford, and Jayson Werth were not nearly as productive after signing long-term deals compared to the season prior to the negotiation.  On that note, Jose Reyes and Albert Pujols may not be as safe as you thought.

 

For all nine Fantasy Factors visit BloombergSports.com.

 

Fantasy Baseball 2012 Preview: Top Five Catchers

 

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

There are often a few catchers who stand out as the finest of their generation.  In the 1980s it was Hall of Famers Gary Carter and Carlton Fisk.  The 1990s brought us Mike Piazza and Pudge Rodriguez.  The 2000s were dominated by archrivals Jason Varitek and Jorge Posada.  Now in the ’10s we have a fresh generation of talent.

 

The fifth best backstop this season will be Giants masked marvel Buster Posey.  After a stellar rookie season that included 18 home runs and a .305 average, Posey was again enjoying some success last season while showing a little more plate discipline.  This season Bloomberg Sports projects Posey to return to prominence after a nasty collision at home plate ended his sophomore season prematurely.  Expect 17 home runs, 76 RBI, and a .282 batting clip.

 

Coming in at number four is the player with perhaps the most upside on this list, Carlos Santana.  As a rookie last season, Santana powered 27 home runs with 79 RBI and 84 runs.  Though he hit just .234, Santana’s 97 walks are a tremendous total for such a young player.  Bloomberg Sports projects 25 home runs with 89 RBI and even five stolen bases for Santana this season.

 

The third best catcher this season is also the steadiest: Brian McCann.  The Braves star has 20-plus home runs in five of the last six seasons.  While he does not offer any speed on the base paths, he does have a great deal of power and usually hits for a high average.  Expect 24 home runs with 85 RBI form the 28-year-old veteran.

 

Coming in as the second best catcher is Twins sensation Joe Mauer.  Fantasy managers have to come to grips with what Mauer now offers.  Since the move to Target Field, Mauer does not pack much pop.  He also lacks speed due to the many leg injuries he has suffered behind the plate.  On the other hand, Mauer is a high average option with solid run production.  Expect 13 home runs with a .306 batting clip for the former MVP contender.

 

Finally, the top-hitting catcher in fantasy baseball is Mike Napoli.  The Rangers slugger became a household name in Texas last season thanks to his 30 home runs and .319 average.  Napoli proved his worth on the offensive and defensive side of the diamond and after going in the mid-to-late rounds of fantasy drafts last season he now ranks at the top of his position.  Expect him to offer a repeat performance with 30 home runs and 87 RBI.

 

For more fantasy baseball insight visit BloombergSports.com.

MLB Sluggers on the Rise: Eric Hosmer, Jay Bruce, and Paul Goldschmidt

 

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

When it comes to sleepers fantasy managers are often looking for late round picks that could contribute throughout the season.  A more valuable sleeper is the talent who is already drafted in the middle rounds, but has the ability to reach superstar potential.  Kansas City first baseman Eric Hosmer happens to fit that mold of sleeper.

 

The 22-year-old talent was the third overall pick of the 2008 draft.  Last year he earned his first taste of Big League action and he found immediate success.  The Miami native did it all.  He blasted 19 home runs, swiped 11 bases, and offered a .293 average.

 

While Hosmer may be the Royals top young talent, he is not alone.  After several years of struggles, the Royals finally have the making of a top-notch lineup with veterans such as Billy Butler and Alex Gordon joined by Hosmer, Mike Moustakas, amongst others.

 

This season Hosmer should take another step forward and fantasy managers considering drafting Mark Texeira in the first or second rounds are better off scooping Hosmer in the fourth or fifth rounds.  He is more well-rounded than Texeira and could end up offering similar power production as well.  Hosmer is one of the top sleepers in baseball even if you have to draft him in the middle rounds.

 

The Reds already have one megastar in the form of Joey Votto, but there may be another in the lineup.  Jay Bruce actually had more buzz around him when he made his debut than Votto.  The 12th pick of the 2005 draft, Bruce has been in the Big Leagues since he was 21-years old.  While there have been some growing pains over the last few seasons, he has improved, and at 25-years old he should be closer to his prime this season.

 

Bruce has always possessed power.  He already has 100 career home runs before he even turned 25.  Last season was his first reaching the 30-home run plateau, as he slammed 32 round-trippers.  More impressive for his sabermetric fans, Bruce offered great patience at the plate with 71 walks, which made up for his .256 batting clip.

 

One of the streakiest hitters in the game, Bruce blasted 12 home runs with a .342 average in May, but then hit less than .240 in three of the next four months.  Fantasy managers are hoping that another year under his belt will lead to some maturity and consistency at the plate.  Bruce is one of the rare talents who can slam 40 home runs with a .280-plus average.  However, that’s just talk of potential, and when drafting you need to take more into account.

 

He’s already in his mid-20s, but Paul Goldschmidt could end up being a fantasy star as soon as this season.  An eighth round pick out of Texas State, Goldschmidt has been a pleasant surprise in the Diamondbacks farm system.

 

Goldschmidt’s power is legit, as he has slammed 73 round-trippers over the last two seasons.  He also has cut down on his strikeouts and increased his walks the last few seasons.  In his Big League debut, Goldschmidt slammed eight home runs in 48 games.  He also swiped four bases, which is a pleasant surprise for a slugger.

 

While sluggers often take some time to develop in the Big Leagues, Goldschmidt is expected to produce as soon as this season.  BloombergSports.com Front Office projects 30 home runs this season, which could land the Diamondbacks right back in the thick of the hunt for the Division Title.

Fantasy Baseball Preview: Edwin Jackson, Erik Bedard, and Yu Darvish

 

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

 

Edwin Jackson is young, durable, and has been a winner with 10-plus wins in each of the last four seasons.  The solid track record begs the question why did so many teams pass on him.

 

The 28-year-old hurler is now on his seventh Major League team and he hasn’t played for losers either.  He went 5-2 down the stretch for the Cardinals last season, playing a role in the team’s World Series Championship.

 

One of the hardest throwing hurlers in baseball, Jackson has improved his control over the years.  His greatest weakness recently is that he is just too hittable.  Even in his successful run with the Cardinals the opposition hit .300 against him.  The good news is that he keeps the ball in the yards, but for fantasy managers looking for a low WHIP, Jackson is not a solution.

 

The move to Washington means he’ll now don the jersey for his sixth team over the last four years.  However, Bloomberg Sports likes his fantasy value.  The larger ballpark and National League setting should translate to 170 strikeouts, double-digit wins, and a 4.21 ERA.

 

Jackson is a fine low-risk, high ceiling option in the later rounds of fantasy drafts.  After all, it was just a few years back that he threw a no-hitter while pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks.  Let’s see if he can finally sustain such dominance over a full season.

 

Once one of the hurlers in the most demand in the Major Leagues, Erik Bedard hopes to build on his improvement from last season while joining the Pittsburgh Pirates.

 

Bedard was a disaster in Seattle.  Because of injuries, he never lived up to the hype and while the Mariners traded away top prospect Adam Jones to the Orioles for him, they ended up letting him go for very little in return last season to the Red Sox.

 

The good news is that Bedard showed that even after all of the injury-ravaged seasons, he still has some potential right now.  He offered fine control last season and fanned a batter per inning throughout the year.

 

A move to Pittsburgh should lead to some good results for Bedard’s fantasy managers.  Pittsburgh’s ballpark plays neutral and he will no longer have to deal with designated hitters in the majority of his starts.  Most importantly, he has sustained his health, which is the key to his performance.

 

BloombergSports.com projects a solid 3.74 ERA and 1 .30 WHIP from the veteran hurler this season, and with some luck he could reach double-digit wins for the first time in five years.

 

The loss of CJ Wilson could be crushing to the Texas Rangers.  Just a year removed from a second World Series, the Rangers lost their ace for a second time.  First it was Cliff Lee who bolted to rejoin the Phillies.  Now it’s Wilson, and while he may not be as dominant as Lee, the fact that he joins the rival LA Angels of Anaheim makes matters worse.

 

The Rangers were desperate to respond and without many proven stars on the market they had to compete with teams including the Toronto Blue Jays to land Yu Darvish, an ace from Japan.  With an enormous bid, the Rangers land the hard-throwing hurler who will enjoy the loftiest expectations by a free agent to join the Rangers perhaps since Alex Rodriguez signed his now infamous $252 million deal.

 

As far as realistic projections for Darvish, BloombergSports.com offers a 13-8 record, 185 strikeouts, and a 3.63 ERA for the hard-throwing hurler.   That makes him the 16th best starting pitcher, and a top-50 fantasy talent.

 

Despite the lofty projections, there is still a great deal of risk for fantasy managers.  After all, Darvish is new to America and will have to adapt culturally to Major League Baseball, plus he calls home to one of the most hitter-friendly parks in the league.  He will not get away with many mistakes and the media will be hounding him all season long.

 

For more fantasy baseball insight visit BloombergSports.com.

Fantasy Baseball Sleepers: Jhoulys Chacin, Mat Latos, Matt Moore

BY ROB SHAW

Twitter: @RobShawSports

There was once a time when drafting a Colorado Rockies pitcher in your fantasy league was nothing but trouble, but after we saw Ubaldo Jimenez not just tame the altitude, but dominate in it, fantasy managers are willing to invest in a Rockies hurler.  One pitcher who is drawing a great deal of interest is Jhoulys Chacin.

The 24-year-old hurler was hurt last season by a lack of defensive and offensive support as his record was just 11-14 and more than 10% of runs scored against him were unearned.  However, some of his struggles were self-inflicted.  Chacin walked 87 batters and surrendered 20 home runs.  Though he still managed a solid 3.62 ERA, he was flirting with danger despite the stellar .231 average against.

What makes Chacin so effective in Coors is that he keeps the ball on the ground.  In fact, of all pitchers in the Majors last season with at least 100 innings pitched, Chacin ranked seventh with a 57% ground ball rate.

While Chacin is a solid pitcher the question is whether he will become a great pitcher.  In order to do so he has to improve his control, which would result in a lower WHIP, better ERA, and a career-high in wins.  At 24 years old, there is a great deal of upside for Chacin and it is fair to assume that he’ll take a step in the right direction this season.

Typically pitching in a pitcher’s park is more advantageous than a hitter’s bandbox.  There is an argument to the contrary for Reds hurler Mat Latos who makes his way from San Diego’s PETCO Park to Cincinnati.  The greatest liability in Latos statistics last season was the 9-14 record.  Otherwise, the second-year hurler was stellar with a 3.47 ERA and 1.18 WHIP.

The idea here is that Latos could use a little run support.  With Adrian Gonzalez having left the west coast for Boston last season, Latos had few batters to offer the run support needed for a winning record.  That should not be an issue this season as he once again will have an MVP candidate manning first base with Joey Votto, plus the presence of Brandon Phillips and Jay Bruce among others in the lineup.

Expect a rise in the ERA as the hitter-friendly ballpark can’t be ignored, but it will come with nearly 200 strikeouts and around 15 wins.

The Rays will compete once again in the AL East thanks to the fine young talent making up their starting rotation.  While the Yankees and Red Sox acquire talent in trades and via free agency, the Rays secure their stars via drafts.

The next top prospect to follow the path of David Price and Jeremy Hellickson as prospects turned stars is rookie Matt Moore.  In his first taste of the Big Leagues, Moore actually pitched more post-season innings than he did in the regular season.  In 19.1 combined innings, Moore fanned 23 batters compared to just six walks.

In the minor leagues, Moore dominated while fanning batters at a shocking rate.  The sunshine state southpaw surpassed 200 strikeouts in both seasons despite pitching 155 innings or fewer.  Similar to Hellickson last season, Moore will likely make an immediate fantasy impact, though with more K’s.  On the other hand, the Rays will likely play it safe and limit him to around 180 innings.

While most fantasy managers prefer proven commodities when it comes to fantasy drafts, there are very few hurlers with the upside of Moore’s, and yet you can likely nab him as late as the 10th round.  For more fantasy insight visit BloombergSports.com.

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